History with its flickering lamp stumbles along the trail of the past, trying to reconstruct its scenes, to revive its echoes, and kindle with pale gleams the passion of former days. ~Winston Churchill

31 March, 2013

Postcards of Easter

It's the part of the term where I go MIA, but I couldn't possibly let a holiday pass without a jaunt to the postcard collection of the New York Public Library! Especially when so many  of this holiday's are, quite frankly, bizarre. 

Happy Easter!


New York Public Library

Postmarked 1909. Source



New York Public Library

Unwritten. Source



New York Public Library

Postmarked 1909. Source




New York Public Library

Postmarked 191-[last digit cut off]. Source



New York Public Library

"Dear Clara, another card for that album. this is a fine day hope it will be a nice easter. from Nettie. I got your letter will come some time come out when you can." 1910.  Source



New York Public Library

Unwritten. Source



New York Public Library

1911. Source



New York Public Library

1911. Source



New York Public Library

I love how the writer has "identified" some of the creepy egg-head people. 1906. Source



New York Public Library

Postmarked 1908. Source



New York Public Library

I love how little sense this makes. Postmarked 1910. Source



New York Public Library

Chicks watching TV in an Easter egg. Postmarked 1911. Source



New York Public Library

Unwritten (though the back is printed upside-down). Source



New York Public Library

1909. Source



New York Public Library

Unwritten. Source



New York Public Library

Written ("best wishes") but no date or postmark. Source



New York Public Library

Postmarked 1909. Source



New York Public Library

The traditional Easter invasion of a rooster-mounted rabbit army. Undated. Source



New York Public Library

Postmarked 1924. Source



New York Public Library

Postmarked April 14 or 1914, with a cute easter-egg shaped postmark. Source



New York Public Library

"Are you playing baseball now? Look at this fun audience. Cousin Elsie." Source



New York Public Library

No date, but the mystery of what happened to the middle letters of "greetings."  Source



New York Public Library

Postmarked 1909. Source



New York Public Library

A Polish Easter, complete with traditional kayak. Source



New York Public Library

Postmarked 1912. The "happy easter" and address have been crossed out in black crayon for some reason. Source



New York Public Library

The best part is the misspelling of "gladness" ("gladnees"). 1909. Source



New York Public Library

...why the brick wall in the Easter egg? Postmarked 1910. Source



New York Public Library

Embroidered and beribboned. No date (but a near-illegible address). Source



New York Public Library

Vroolyk paaschfeest. (Dutch) Source



New York Public Library

The three chicks from Macbeth. 1906. Source



New York Public Library

Unwritten. Source



New York Public Library

"Dear Anna, Turn the wheel slowly and see the changes. Aunt Irene joins in sending best wishes. Uncle [something -ton]." That's right, part of the egg turns and gives you crazy (for ca. 1909) effects. I want one. [edited to add: I actually saw a card with one of these spinny things for sale on ebay! it went for about fifty bucks, which I sadly did not have.]  Source


4 comments:

Ana said...

That last one was unexpected... and amazing :D !

Anna said...

I know, who would have thought they had that kind of card back then? I want to play with it! :)

Madonna Weaver said...

I am working on my children's stories with activities that I aim to self publish this Sept and sell. I found the picture of the Easter card on Public Domain of the rabbits playing baseball and at the bottom of the picture is the State Library. I am writing to ask permission if I am able to use this picture and informational line underneath in my story Freddy and The Jets. I would put the website and reference and author name. Regards Madonna Weaver

Anna said...

Hi Madonna! The postcard and image belong to the New York Public Library, and they are the only ones who can give the proper permissions. You can have a look at their guidelines here: http://www.nypl.org/help/about-nypl/legal-notices/website-terms-and-conditions . Images from the NYPL site, such as the postcard, may be used for "personal, educational, or research purposes", as they are here. However, for commercial purposes, such as an ebook, you likely have to pay a reproductions fee. There is information about that here: http://www.nypl.org/help/get-what-you-need/photographic-services/obtaining-images . The link to the postcard's page on the NYPL site is directly under the image on my page so you can easily find all relevant information for them.
Thanks for asking, and good luck!

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