History with its flickering lamp stumbles along the trail of the past, trying to reconstruct its scenes, to revive its echoes, and kindle with pale gleams the passion of former days. ~Winston Churchill

14 January, 2012

Sweden in Blue

Cyanotype is a photographic printing process where the image is created not by silver, but by iron, resulting in a strong blue tint. While the process was invented in the 1840s, it was most popular at the end of the 19th century and early 20th. Since it's cheap and easy, it appealed especially to amateurs who could develop their own snapshots at home. 

 This set of cyanotypes comes from Swedish physician and amateur photographer Carl Curman (1833-1913), beautiful blue views of the country and its people at the end of the 20th century.  


Swedish National Heritage Board

Horse-drawn trams in Stockholm, 1900. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Trollhättan Falls, 1888. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Stockholm, 1900. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Three women in the grass, 1880s. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Villa of the author Viktor Rydberg, Djursholm, Uppland. c. 1890. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Tegelbacken, Stockholm, c. 1900. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Men's bath (left) and the Curman villa (centre), Lysekil, 1875. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Seaside restaurant in Lysekil, 1880. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Trollhättan Falls. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

At villa Bergshyddan, c. 1890. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Carolina Curman, mother of the photographer, c. 1885. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Calla Curman, the photographer's wife, with a guitar, 1880s. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Man and a boy in Lysekil, c. 1890. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

People in a garden, c.1890. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Seven men, Lysekil. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

People indoors, c. 1880. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Fishermen in Lysekil, 1860s. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

A young woman sitting, c. 1890. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Three women and a child, 1880s. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

Trollhättan Falls. Source



Swedish National Heritage Board

View of Stockholm from the Katarina lift (Gamla Stan, the Old Town, is to the left, if you know the city). Source


2 comments:

Mike Brubaker said...

I found your website when searching for an image of Trollhättan Falls. A great collection of vintage photos! Thank you.

You might like my photo-blog of vintage photographs of musicians and musical ensembles.
http://temposenzatempo.blogspot.com/

Anna said...

Ah, terrific, some great images of Trollhatten falls in this post! I'm so glad you've enjoyed it! Your site looks great as well, I shall definitely be visiting!

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